Fluid Dynamics, Geometry and Computer Science in interaction Exploration of new horizons

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Workshop
From September 16, 2024
to September 20, 2024

VENUE:

16,17,19 and 20 of September: CRM Auditorium

18 September: Exploratory session in Barcelona

introduction

The exploratory workshop Fluid Dynamics, Geometry and Computer Science in Interaction. Exploration of new horizons is an upcoming event scheduled to take place in Barcelona, Spain during the week of September 16, 2024. The workshop is organized by the Centre de Recerca Matemàtica (CRM), Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya (UPC) and the Institute d’Estudis Catalans (IEC).

The primary objective of this workshop is to provide a platform for researchers and experts from various fields to explore the Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations from multiple perspectives, including dynamics, geometry, and computer-assisted proofs. By examining these equations from different angles, the workshop aims to inspire new ideas, create novel connections, and foster collaborations between specialists from distant fields.

The workshop will feature several plenary talks, delivered by eminent researchers and experts from around the world. The plenary talks will cover a broad range of topics related to fluid dynamics, geometry, and computer science, and will explore the intersections between these fields. Additionally, there will be some special exploratory talks, which will focus on cutting-edge research and emerging trends in the field.

Furthermore, the workshop will include a round table discussion, which will bring together participants from diverse backgrounds to exchange ideas, share their perspectives, and identify new directions for future research. The round table will provide a forum for participants to discuss the challenges and opportunities of interdisciplinary research and identify potential avenues for collaboration.

Overall, the exploratory workshop “Fluid Dynamics, Geometry and Computer Science in Interaction. Exploration of new horizons” promises to be an exciting and thought-provoking event that will push the boundaries of research in these fields and inspire new collaborations and innovations.

Plenary Speakers

Pierre Berger

Pierre Berger

IMJ-PRG, CNRS, Sorbonne Université

Pierre Berger is a Director of Research in Fundamental Mathematics (CNRS-IJM PRG-Sorbonne University). A former student of the École Normale Supérieure, he also trained at the École Nationale Supérieure des Arts Décoratifs. His works are on Dynamical Systems and Exhibitions on Contemporary Mathematics. He is the coordinator of many exhibitions on 3 manifolds, showing images, installations and movies made alone or in collaboration with scientists and artists. The pieces are based on new research in pure mathematics. Thousands of visitors have seen these works, in the Paris suburbs, Rio de Janeiro, and in a permanent exhibition in Mexico.

Personal Website

Mark Braverman

Mark Braverman

Princeton University

I received my BA in mathematics and computer science in 2001 from the Technion. I received my PhD in 2008 from the Department of Computer Science at the University of Toronto under the supervision of Stephen Cook. My thesis was on the computability and complexity of Julia sets, a topic on which I worked with Michael Yampolsky. I have been a professor of computer science at Princeton University since 2015. I joined Princeton in 2011 as an assistant professor.

With my students and postdocs I work on theoretical computer science, and its connections to other disciplines, especially in information theory, mathematical analysis, and economics. You can find my publications here. My research is supported by a number of awards, including a 2013 Packard Fellowship and a 2019 NSF Waterman award.

Personal Website

Robert Cardona

Robert Cardona

Universitat de Barcelona

Robert Cardona is an assistant professor at the Universitat de Barcelona. He earned his Ph.D. in Mathematics at the Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya in 2021 and was awarded the Vicent Caselles prize from the Royal Spanish Mathematical Society. After his doctoral studies, he was a postdoctoral fellow at the Université de Strasbourg and at the Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas.

His research interests are mostly geometry, topology, and dynamical systems. His work centers on contact/symplectic geometry, Hamiltonian dynamics, geometric hydrodynamics, and their interaction.

Personal Website

Julian Chaidez

Julian Chaidez

USC Dornsife College of Letters, Arts and Sciences

Professor Chaidez is interested in a broad set of topics in geometry, topology, dynamics and analysis. He is particularly interested in applications of modern methods in symplectic topology to open problems in smooth dynamical systems, classical mechanics and low-dimensional topology.

Personal Website

Kai Cieliebak

Kai Cieliebak

Augsburg University

Kai Cieliebak is a mathematician who works at University of Augsburg. His research focuses on symplectic and contact geometry, Hamiltonian dynamics, string topology, symplectic field theory, and pseudoholomorphic curve theory. Cieliebak studied mathematics and physics at Ruhr-Universität Bochum, receiving the degree of Diplom-Mathematiker in 1993. In 1996 he obtained his Ph.D. at ETH Zürich, and from 1996 to 1997 he was a Benjamin Pierce Assistant Professor at Harvard.

Personal Website

Diego Córdoba

Diego Córdoba

Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas (ICMAT)

Diego Córdoba is a research professor at the Institute of Mathematical Sciences (ICMAT) and scientific director of the Center’s Severo Ochoa excellence program. He earned his Ph.D. in Mathematics from Princeton University in 1998. His research focuses on partial differential equations, fluid mechanics, and analysis. He is the co-author of more than 60 research articles, published in prestigious journals such as Annals of Mathematics, Journal of the American Mathematical Society, and Communications on Pure and Applied Mathematics.

Among other recognitions obtained, the SEMA Award (Spanish Society of Applied Mathematics) for young researchers in 2005 and the Miguel Catalán Award 2011 from the Community of Madrid stand out.

Personal Website

Alberto Enciso

Alberto Enciso

Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas (ICMAT)

Enciso is a CSIC Research Professor at Madrid’s Institute of Mathematical Sciences (ICMAT). He studied physics and mathematics at the Universidad Complutense de Madrid, where he received his doctorate in mathematical physics. In 2011 he received the José Luis Rubio de Francia Prize for the best young Spanish mathematician from the Royal Spanish Mathematical Society (RSME), in 2013 the Antonio Valle Prize from the Spanish Society for Applied Mathematics (SEMA, Sociedad Española de Matemática Aplicada) and in 2014 the Prince of Girona Science Prize. In 2014 he received a Starting Grant from the European Research Council. 

His research interests are mostly in partial differential equations, fluid mechanics, and spectral theory.

Personal Website

Anna Florio

Anna Florio

Université Paris Dauphine-PSL

Florio is an assistant professor in Mathematics at the Université Paris Dauphine-PSL. She is a member of the CEREMADE (Centre de Recherche en Mathématiques de la Décision). Before that, from November 2019 to August 2021, she was Post-doc of Fondation Sciences Mathématiques de Paris at IMJ-PRG and CEREMADE (Paris, France) under the supervision of Jean-Pierre Marco and Jacques Féjoz.

She prepared her  PhD thesis Asymptotic Maslov indices at Avignon Université (Avignon, France) under the supervision of Professor Marie-Claude Arnaud and Andrea Venturelli.

Her main research interests are dynamical systems. In particular, she is working on the Asymptotic Maslov index. 

Personal Website

Susan Friedlander

Susan Friedlander

University of Southern California

After many years at the University of Illinois at Chicago I now have a new home at the University of Southern California where I am a Professor in the Mathematics Department and Director of the Center for Applied Mathematical Sciences.

My research centers on the partial differential equations that describe the motion of fluids, namely the Euler and the Navier-Stokes equations. I am currently working in topics connected with fluid instabilities and mathematical models for turbulence.

I am the Editor in Chief of the Bulletin of the American Mathematical Society.

Personal Website

Hansjörg Geiges

Hansjörg Geiges

Universität zu Köln

Hansjörg Geiges is Professor of Mathematics at the University of Cologne. He has received several teaching awards, and an EMS prize for mathematical exposition. His book An Introduction to Contact Topology, published by Cambridge University Press in 2008, has become a highly cited standard reference for the field.

Personal Website

Robert Ghrist

Robert Ghrist

University of Pennsylvania

Robert Ghrist (Ph.D., Cornell, Applied Mathematics, 1995) is the Andrea Mitchell PIK Professor of Mathematics and Electrical & Systems Engineering at the University of Pennsylvania. He is a recognized leader in the field of Applied Algebraic Topology, working in sensor networks, robotics, signal processing, data analysis, optimization, and more. He is an award-winning researcher, teacher, and expositor of Mathematics and its applications. In his spare time, he enjoys animation and video production.

Personal Website

Javier Gomez Serrano

Javier Gomez Serrano

Brown University

I am an Associate Professor at Brown University. Before that, I was a Distinguished Researcher at the University of Barcelona. Before that, I was an Instructor and an Assistant Professor at Princeton. I co-organize the Brown PDE Seminar.

My research interests are on the boundary between analysis, partial differential equations, fluid mechanics, spectral geometry, numerical computation and rigorous computer-assisted proofs. Quanta Magazine wrote a piece (‘Deep Learning Poised to ‘Blow Up’ Famed Fluid Equations’) on my recent work with Tristan Buckmaster, Ching-Yao Lai and Yongji Wang.

I was honored with an ERC Starting Grant between 2020 and 2022.

Personal Website

Daniel S. Graça

Daniel S. Graça

Universidade do Algarve

Assistant professor (with Habilitation) at the Departament of Mathematics, Faculty of Science and Technology at the University of Algarve. Member of the Security and Quantum Information Group at the Telecommunications Institute.

Research topics

  • Dynamical systems and computation
  • Models of computation over continuous spaces

Other activities

Personal Website

Thomas Hou

Thomas Hou

California Institute of Technology

Thomas Yizhao Hou is the Charles Lee Powell Professor of Applied and Computational Mathematics in the Department of Computing and Mathematical Sciences at the California Institute of Technology. He studied at the South China University of Technology, where he received a B.S. in Mathematics in 1982. He completed his Ph.D. in Mathematics at the University of California. He has been on the faculty of the California Institute of Technology since 1993. Hou is known for his research on multiscale analysis and singularity formation of the three-dimensional incompressible Euler and Navier-Stokes equations.

Personal Website

Ana Rechtman

Ana Rechtman

Université de Strasbourg

Ana Rechtman is a professor at the University of Strasbourg. She investigates aspects of geometry and dynamic systems, such as flows, foliations and topological dynamics.

Personal Website

Kai Schneider

Kai Schneider

Aix-Marseille Université

Dr. Kai Schneider is a Professor of Mechanics and Applied Mathematics at Aix Marseille University, Marseille, France, since 2000. He obtained his Master degree in Applied Mathematics in 1993 and his Ph.D. degree in 1996, both from the University of Kaiserslautern, Germany. In 2001 he got his Habilitation from the University Louis Pasteur, Strasbourg, France. His current research activities are focused on the development of multiscale techniques and wavelets for scientific computing and their application for modeling and computing turbulent flows, including fluid-structure interaction with application to bio-fluids, multi-phase flows and magnetohydrodynamic turbulence.

Personal Website

Terence Tao

Terence Tao

University of California

I am a Professor at the Department of Mathematics, UCLA. I work in a number of mathematical areas, but primarily in harmonic analysis, PDE, geometric combinatorics, arithmetic combinatorics, analytic number theory, compressed sensing, and algebraic combinatorics.  I am part of the Analysis Group here at UCLA, and also an editor or associate editor at several mathematical journals. Here are  my papers and preprints, my books, and my research blog.

I maintain a harmonic analysis mailing list and contributed to the DispersiveWiki project.  I used to maintain a harmonic analysis page for conferences and other links.

Think you might know me from somewhere?  Here’s how you can contact me.  If you are a representative of the media, please visit this page instead.  

Personal Website

Francisco Torres de Lizaur

Francisco Torres de Lizaur

Universidad de Sevilla

My research lies on the boundary of analysis of PDEs, geometry and dynamical systems.

I am currently a Ramón y Cajal researcher at the Faculty of Mathematics of the University of Seville. Before that, I was a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Toronto. and at the Max-Planck Institute for Mathematics in Bonn.

Personal Website

Cornelia Vizman

Cornelia Vizman

Universitatea de Vest din Timișoara

CV

Exploratory talks

Yang-Hui He

Yang-Hui He

University of Oxford

Yang-Hui He is a Fellow at the London Institute, which is based at the Royal Institution of Great Britain, as well as a lecturer and former Fellow at Merton College, Oxford. He holds honourary positions as visiting professor of mathematics at University of London, Chang-Jiang Chair professor at Nankai University, and President of STEMM Global scientific society. Yang works on the interface between quantum field theory, string theory, algebraic geometry and number theory, as well as how AI and machine-learning help with these problems. Yang is the author of over 200 scientific publications and is also a keen communicator of science, giving regular public lectures including the Royal Institution Friday Evening Discourse , as well as being an advisor to BMUCO, and a fellow of the One Garden.

Personal Website

Jonathan Jaquette

Jonathan Jaquette

New Jersey Institute of Technology

I am a postdoc in the Department of Mathematics and Statistics at Boston University. My research focuses on nonlinear dynamics, with an emphasis on computer assisted proofs and infinite dimensional systems such as PDEs and DDEs.

In Fall 2023 I will join the New Jersey Institute of Technology as an Assistant Professor.

Personal Website

Lluís Jofre

Lluís Jofre

Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya

Since 2020, I am a Beatriz Galindo Professor & Researcher (Ministry of Science, Innovation and Universities, Spain) in the Department of Fluid Mechanics of the Universitat Politecnica de Catalunya – BarcelonaTech (Spain), where I teach courses on Fluid Mechanics, Thermodynamics and Transport Phenomena, and I organize/lead research and collaborate on topics related to Multiscale Fluid Mechanics, Data Science, Model Reduction, UQ and Computational Science & Engineering with applications to advanced energy, propulsion & transportation systems, biomedical applications, and manufacturing technology. In January 2022, it was announced that my ERC Starting Grant 2021 proposal [Turbulence-On-a-Chip: Supercritically Overcoming the Energy Frontier in Microfluidics (SCRAMBLE)] had been selected for funding. The project will focus on achieving turbulent flow regimes at microfluidic conditions by means of utilizing supercritical fluids. The scientific insight obtained will be leveraged to propose and design improved microfluidic energy solutions and systems.

Personal Website

Boris A. Khesin

Boris A. Khesin

University of Toronto

Boris Khesin is a Russian and Canadian mathematician working on infinite-dimensional Lie groups, Poisson geometry and hydrodynamics. He is a professor at the University of Toronto.

Khesin obtained his Ph.D. from Moscow State University in 1990 under the supervision of Vladimir Arnold. In 1997 he was awarded the Aisenstadt Prize. Boris Khesin specializes in instructing high-level calculus, including trigonometric functions, inverse function theorem, differentiation, integration, and fundamental theorem of calculus.

Personal Website

Joël Ouaknine

Joël Ouaknine

Max Planck Institute for Software Systems

Joël Ouaknine is a Scientific Director at the Max Planck Institute for Software Systems in Saarbrücken, Germany. His research interests straddle theoretical computer science and mathematics, and lie mainly at the intersection of dynamical systems and computation, making use of tools from number theory, Diophantine geometry, algebraic geometry, and mathematical logic. Joël studied mathematics at McGill University, and received a PhD in Computer Science from Oxford in 2001. He subsequently held postdoc positions at Tulane University and Carnegie Mellon University, and became Full Professor of Computer Science at Oxford in 2010. He received the Roger Needham Award in 2010, an ERC grant in 2015, and was elected member of Academia Europaea in 2020; the same year he also received the Arto Salomaa Prize (jointly with James Worrell), for “outstanding contributions to Theoretical Computer Science, in particular to the theory of timed automata and to the analysis of dynamical systems”. He was elected Fellow of the ACM in 2021 for “contributions to algorithmic analysis of dynamical systems”.

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James Ben Worrell

James Ben Worrell

University of Oxford

Professor James Worrell is a Senior Research Fellow of Green Templeton College. He is Professor of Computer Science at the Department of Computer Science, University of Oxford.

James has a BA in Mathematics and a DPhil in Computer Science, both from the University of Oxford. His research focuses on computational aspects of dynamical systems, with applications to verification and program analysis. From 2016-2021 he held an EPSRC established-career fellowship Verification of Linear Dynamical Systems. In 2020 he was jointly awarded the EATCS Salomaa prize in automata theory, formal languages, and related topics.

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Martin Zwierlein

Martin Zwierlein

Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Martin Zwierlein is the Thomas A. Frank Professor of Physics at MIT and Principal Investigator in the Research Laboratory of Electronics and the NSF Center for Ultracold Atoms. Zwierlein studied physics at the University of Bonn and at the Ecole Normale Supérieure in Paris, and received his PhD in experimental atomic physics from MIT in 2007, with a thesis supervised by Wolfgang Ketterle on the observation of superfluidity in atomic Fermi gases. After a postdoctoral stay at the University of Mainz in the group of Immanuel Bloch, he joined the MIT physics department in 2007, where he received tenure in 2012 and promotion to Full Professor in 2013.

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The exploratory session in Barcelona will include a round table moderated by Terence Tao.

Organizers

Ángel González Prieto | Universidad Complutense de Madrid

Eva Miranda | Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya-CRM

Daniel Peralta-Salas | Instituto de Ciencias Matemáticas-CSIC

accommodation

ON-CAMPUS AND BELLATERRA

BARCELONA AND OFF-CAMPUS 

acknowledgments

 

For inquiries about this event please contact the crmactivitats@crm.cat